Potcast 108: Back to the Land

I’ve always been fascinated by back to the landers - People choosing to live a self-sufficient life close to nature - growing food from the land and building an autonomous, sustainable, community. The back to the land social movement is characterized by the idea that everyday life is methodically practiced and based on a set of moral values or choices. For many back to the landers, homesteading became a spiritual practice, giving meaning to daily life through the values of simplicity and anti-consumerism.

Today’s guest on the potcast shares a fascinating story of making his way to Humboldt County in the 1980’s. He tells us of the life he made, and the community he helped build that sustains him thirty years later.

‘After the Show’ Notes

Thank you for the hospitality, John!  What a delicious treat to break bread with you. Your signature sourdough fresh out of the oven was outta this world!   Connect on Instagram: @kingsviewfarms

Thank you for the hospitality, John! What a delicious treat to break bread with you. Your signature sourdough fresh out of the oven was outta this world!

Connect on Instagram: @kingsviewfarms

John Wilhelm owns and operates King’s View Farms in the Palo Verde appellation of Humboldt County.

He grows full-sun, organic cannabis with a zero carbon footprint and integrative pest management practices. John happily grows sacred medicine with love and positive intentions for people like you and me to use responsibly. 

Experience King’s View Farms Flower

Find dispensaries in California carrying Flow Kana supported sun-grown farmers here.

And, explore this coffee table book printed during prohibition featuring a very incognito look at John and his friends’ lives as cannabis farmers in the Emerald Triangle.

The farm-to-table movement is quintessential back to the land mentality.

It was coined in California born from the idea of creating your own food supply chain and eating and sharing locally to sustain your community and nature. I experienced this first hand being given produce from the farmers I visited with enough to share with the next home I visited. Fruits, veggies, delicious sourdough loaves, coffee. I was even offered a seat at the breakfast table of someone I’d just met.

Though “back to the land” sounds isolating, it’s a very generous and welcoming experience. Thank you, John, for showing me the ropes.

Kumbaya and cannabis,

Jo

EXPLORE KING’S VIEW FARMS WITH JOHN & ME


If you want to immerse yourself in nature and the Humboldt community culture, consider a multiple day retreat at Heartwood, one of the places John will always consider home. And a place I’ll go visit again.

Heartwood is definitely not a place to stay for one or two nights, and it’s certainly not on your way to anywhere else. You’re deep in the heart of the wilderness about 1-hour up winding dirt roads. It’s truly a rewarding back to the land 2.0 adventure.